This One's for the Torn Down; the Experts at the Fall

In the 1940’s, Belvedere was briefly used as a holding base for prisoners of war, located on an island just off the coast of England. However, after the war ended, it was reestablished as an institution for the clinically, medically and criminally insane. Founded by a wealthy member of British Parliament, it was built with no cost restriction and quickly became a state of the art facility. But despite the picture perfect image that is portrayed to the outside world, inside the walls of the Belvedere Institute, the patients tell a very different story…

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Belvedere
institution for the clinically insane

Draco Pavlović | Twenty Six; Sadistic and Narcissistic Personalty Disorders

Born in Croatia, but calling no place home as his parents were among the frivolous spenders and ‘least likely to’s settle down, Draco had an unconventional raising to say the least. It’s not that his parents did not care for their son; oh, quite the contrary, they adored him. But they adored him in the way of the shallow and the self-absorbed. They fawned over his beauty and his natural intellect, though did not bother themselves with concerns such as school or stability. 

Draco’s constant tumbling around as a child, in and out of schools, country to country, apartment to beach house, depending on what their drug market money could afford them at the time, wasn’t something his parents ever worried about. They were far more preoccupied with introducing him to the people they socialized with and having him hear stories of their reckless adventure.

They praised him constantly, but they praised him not on the things a parent should—on ambition, on drive, on diligence and accomplishment—but rather on things that were superficial and sometimes even immoral. He was rewarded for tricking his teachers into giving him extensions, encouraged to find ways to cheat the system or to take from others what he ‘deserved’ in life, not what he earned. It was the way his parent’s lived their lives and it was the way they believed Draco should too.

By the time Draco was well into his teenage years, he was used to getting everything he wanted. His looks and charm got him everywhere, and like his parents who made their fluctuating fortunes off drugs and low life criminal activity, he did not know what it meant to truly work for a living, nor to earn his keep in ways of the acceptably civilized. Everything he owned and everything he obtained, he came into possession of through manipulation, cruelty, or illegal activity. Because he’d learned long ago that the greatest accomplishment was one you could achieve by never having to take the long or high road. His life was a game of shortcuts and loop holes.

He became unbearably narcissistic—to others, though not so much to his parents because they were too self involved to really notice one way or another—and his sense of entitlement made him a difficult person to get along with. But worse than that, he was cruel. Draco, whether because of the environment of his childhood or something innate within him no one is precisely sure, but the only child of this Pavlović family was often callous, vicious and degrading, and it wasn’t until his fourth arrest (for assault and drug trafficking the first three of which he’d gotten off relatively easy), that authorities had him psychologically evaluated.

Having been on British soil at the time of the arrest, it was there that he had his trial and there that it was decided he be sent to Belvedere for rehabilitation. 

Level — Two; TAKEN